Amazon seeks FCC permission for testing wireless technology


A secret filling was made to the Federal Communications Commission by none other than Amazon. Amazon intends to run some experiment on certain frequency bands. Since, the American e-shopping giant have already started working on drone; there is a good chance that the frequency bands are connected to delivery drones. The test will be conducted in rural Washington (to be more specific Kennewick) and at their Seattle headquarters. The application to the FCC disclosed the fact that they are asking for the permission of five months on selected frequencies.

On these selected frequencies, the equipment and software will be tasted. The aforementioned software will possess innovative functionalities and communication. For this test, wireless units and three fixed and low-power transmitter will be installed at the mentioned locations. An evaluating antenna might be incorporated according to the filed application. A customer service outlet is also present in the mall at Kennewick.

According to the Amazon filed application, the first test run will be conducted at headquarter in Seattle. There is good chance that it might expand for outdoor test at the Kennewick site. Amazon also asked for the permission to install equipment which will have a coverage radius of 120 kilometres along the Kennewick site. It is meant for flexibility purpose but would limit the test within the five kilometres range of the said facility.

In the application there is a contact given for Neil Woodward.  Neil is a former NASA astronaut who currently works as Senior Manager at Amazon Prime Air for flight test and certification. This contact confirms the fact that the test is connected with the delivery drones. Google and Facebook has also ran similar successful test. Amazon has already delivery packages via drones in UK, but not in their home country. This is because of stringent regulations by the Federal Aviation Administration. Earlier they have patented collective UAV. In simpler terms, it means that in future Amazon may use multiple delivery drones to delivering heavier objects.